Pages

Thursday, September 26, 2013

IMOCA 60 Shape and America's Cup 2013

                                                     Ellison: "Sailing has been changed for ever".
When sailing is more like flying, with such sophisticated machines, how are the technologies adaptable to more mundane venues?
America's Cup boats have a way to continuously improve elements of sailing, and even cruising. But, when we have all of sudden such a leap forward, where new boats; catamarans, wing sails and foils are thrown into the mix, what is going to happen?
The obvious is that the benefits are going to go to cats and trimarans. But, what about regular sailboats? I will leave alone the articulated wing sail, they are not manageable, because of reefing problems, but I think there are possibilities in the foiling area.
A monohull is always looking for stability, so deep keel, ballast and beam are the usual answers. Now, with the new technologies like DSS, which is an outboard deployed foil on a horizontal plan, and the AC foiler, which is an inboard oriented planing board, either concept, provides more stability and righting moment.
To work, we have to have speed, therefore the sailboat will have to be of light displacement, with a fast shape and low deadrise. My attempt is to show how such a configuration might work, of course all is in the details, and I do not pretend to solve the entire matter. It definitely would require very long and elaborate studies, model testing, strong engineering, but I am throwing things in the ring to see where it all lead.


Fast boats are long, light and lean. I choose for this base study the Imoca 60 in its latest form. With a dinghy shape, twin rudders, appendages and keel, the boat is an interesting monohull laboratory. A Class 40, or Mini Transat could be other examples of hulls where the merits of foiling on modified daggerboards could be
studied and compared for speed.
Where to start? Now that we have decided on a hull, the nest step is to describe what I have in mind.
The system has to rely on deployment and retraction of the blade. So, I am starting with the foil itself and I use the present configuration of the daggerboard, bend it at mid distance even before trying to work out surfaces and lift necessary to achieve the result of lifting the hull some ways. Because one of the question remains: how to have the apparatus to match the hull shape when retracted to minimize turbulence at low speed, without impairing the foil shape. Fortunately, the body presents nearly flat surfaces in the area and the daggerboard-foiler can be inclined perpendicular to the hull and designed in such a way that the bottom matches the small curvature of the hull itself. But what happens when you extend the lifting body ? There is a hole. The idea is to build a second blade, contained within a box to fill in the gap and keep flush the integrity of the hull.



  

Friday, September 20, 2013

Dick Carter. 1928-

I could not believe today. I went with my daughter to the crowd gathering at the New York Yacht Club to celebrate the many accomplishments of Ted hood, the sailmaker, entrepreneur and yacht designer.
One is dead the other, Richard E. Carter is resurrected.
Lets back track, it had been announced a while ago that Dick had passed away a few years ago. The rumor had been around, pursued in this blog, sailing web sites and by many people that this had been the case.
What was not my surprise, as I strolled the ground under the tent to see across the serving table a familiar face that I had not seen in 40 years, Dick my boss at Carter Offshore. I look on, in shock. But, the change with age was not drastic and the mannerism was there, and when I called" Dick" he turned around and with a big smile we shook hands. Yves-Marie!
Man oh man, was I happy to see him in good health, alive and well and living on Cape Cod. His announced departure much too premature.
Amazing that in this days and age, news like who is dead cannot be squelched with the first appearance of such erroneous announcement. It was a sad day and a wonderful day when two men like Frederick Hood and Richard E. Carter, friend and competitor with great influence on the sport crossed my path in such a strange way.
The Tower. Carter Offshore office.
Follow the story at the Forum on:
 www.sailinganarchy.com
Carter boat design.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Newport Boat Show 2013.

View of the Newport Brokerage Boat Show at the Shipyard.
Few places in the world where you can see so many boats with very tall masts; all painted white.
I think the Sail and Power Boat Show was smaller this year, not too surprising, while the second hand market was full of very large sailboats for sale, not surprising either. Quite a display as a matter of fact and I had the pleasure to see again old Brokers friends pushing hard quality  merchandise.
I am not fond of Boat Shows for new boats; it is actually depressing. The present form of going on the water is more alike buying a condo, yes here and there you pick one idea or two, mostly from a construction detail which I like, but the rest is plastiky. It might  also be because I do not have boats in shows anymore, yes this must be it!
A little side story.
After a Newport Show, taking slowly the boat back to my mooring under power and reaching a point  half way in the harbor, my eyes caught something white bobbing around in the water. Approaching, I notice a mooring buoy with its pennant obviously separated from its supposed  location. Surprise, my number 722 displayed on the side. Now it is clear that given a few hours one way or the other this incident could have turned into a disaster. Luck, destiny, what?

Saturday, September 14, 2013

Porto Cervo 2013.

 Ran, the Mini Maxi ran the clock with Rolex on this event. Photos by Dominique Tanton.

A little side story.

In 1973, yes you read well! Porto Cervo was the brand new resort created by Karin Agha Khan on the Northern tip of Sardinia. With a man who receives his weight in gold each year (a religious thing); Porto Cervo is to this day, the ultimate resort in the Med. That year the One Tonners gathered there for their World Championship. I delivered one of the Carter 43 to this amazing place to cover the event and serves as a base. Our own Ydra, a Carter One Ton was the boat to beat, having won the previous year. We know the story. Ydra won again, but a small boat Ganbare stole the show with a newer concept about designing boats to the relatively new I. O.R rule. That is not the part I want to write about.
Sailmakers have been influencial to direct potential clients to boat designers. They needed boats for their product. But, none did better at it than Lowell North of North Sails, a relatively small outfit at the time, soon to become the one Logo to have aboard. Here in Italy, rubbing shoulders with Ron Holland (with no boat there, but having just won the 1/4 Ton Cup) and Doug Peterson we could sense the wind of changes. Hood did too and certainly at Carter offshore. North Sails created the marketing momentum, to push customers for Doug, Ron, Dubois and others with talent, to deliver new boats with large inventory required to sail those I.O.R boats and in the process, establishing a new era with new blood.

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Les petits Bateaux..


qui vont sur l'eau.

If the emphasis of TYD is to concentrate on the custom aspect of the boat design business, nevertheless there is also room to capitalize on dozens, maybe hundreds of boat plans that can be sold to amateurs, individual or companies.
Within the past few months, several of those "old " drawings have been purchased, amongst them:

A 37' Pen-Gwyn in Texas.
A 33' Green Peace in Canada.

The video is about the Marconi rigged "Belle Ile" built in Switzerland for a German owner.

                                                                          

A 33' Iletan for Australia.

A 39' "Imagiro" for Turkey.

I encourage you to inquire about purchasing plans at a very reasonable price; what I call "for food money". Heck!  some of the frames for my oil paintings cost more than a complete set of drawings.
Want to see more about the body of work? Drawings, pictures, renderings etc. see:
tantonyachts.com 26 pages at the Gallery.
boatdesign.net     50 pages (600 illustrations) at the Gallery. Click on Top Poster bottom right.
Google and Bing. yves-marie tanton. Images. (countless).
Do not hesitate to contact me for more information.
ymt@tantonyachts.com

Up-date October 26, 2013
Bob Perry asked me to contribute to the Forum about pros and cons for steel boats on:
Http://www.sailnet.com
Realizing that all the designs above are for steel construction, it seems appropriate to agree.